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Monthly Archives: April 2011

Economics begins in the Sanctuary

By Michael Kloss

Joseph did not interpret pharaoh’s dreams through his own cunning; he was blessed by God with wisdom and judged the scenes in pharaoh’s dream prophetically. There is nothing new under the sun and the Wisdom of God is ours for the asking. It is more precious than gold or silver and given to us as kings to judge this world. We must see through new eyes; eyes given to us by Jesus.

Modern famines in the US are often the result of economic bubbles; artificial wealth followed by hard times. Bubbles are made to burst. The foundation of modern economics is borrowing and borrowing. We must see this for what it is. We must not fall into the get rich or keep rich schemes of the world. Prospecting is no wiser if it is done by men in business suites with masters’ Degrees.  Joseph’s strategy, based on the wisdom he received from heaven, was to save for the lean years during the fat years. Biblical economics is simple and difficult all at once. Read the rest of this entry »

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The States’ Role in Social Services

By Dean Hellekson

We live in a day when there is much debate between the jurisdiction of the Church and the State, especially when it comes to social issues.  Many conservatives would say that social issues are solely the responsibility of the Church, and law and order are the responsibility of the State.  On the other hand, many liberals would say that social, moral, educational, parenting and commercial issues are the responsibility of the State.  But the question here isn’t what conservatives or what liberals think about these jurisdictional responsibilities, but rather what God thinks about them.  And of course, we all like to marshal our opinions on the side of God because it makes our rationale all the more definitive.  But if we are to look at the Scriptures and analyze them in their context, and then ask some questions of our context, it might be that we find ourselves neither conservative, nor liberal, but rather something of a hybrid. Read the rest of this entry »